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As autumn approaches, fish farmers can notice a significant change in the behavior of carp. Known for their size and voracious appetite, these bottom feeding fish seem to be even more active and eager to feed this time of year.

In the autumn season, the diet of carp changes significantly. As the temperatures drop and the days get shorter, the carp begin to prepare for the coming winter months. This transition affects their eating habits and nutritional needs.



In the autumn, carp switch to feeding mainly on more protein-rich food sources. This change is driven by the need to build up fat stores for energy in the colder months. Lowering the water temperature also affects their digestion, making them more selective in their food choices.

Factors Affecting the Appetite of Carps in Autumn

The general health of the carp population also plays a role in their appetite. Carp that have health problems such as parasites or infections may have a reduced appetite. Regular monitoring and maintenance of optimal water quality can help prevent health problems and promote a healthy appetite. The carp’s stress level can affect their appetite. Environmental changes, such as fluctuating water conditions or the presence of predators, can cause stress and reduce their desire to feed.

It is also very important to consider the availability of food sources in the pond. In autumn, the abundance of natural food such as insects and vegetation begins to decrease. This deficiency can lead to a reduction in carp feed intake. To compensate for the reduced availability of natural food, fish farmers must ensure a constant supply of high-quality pellets and live food.

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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I was lucky enough to come across this large marble trout (scientific name Salmo marmoratus) which gracefully appeared in front of me and showed its majestic presence for a few fleeting seconds.




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 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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All the fish I caught were released back into the river.

Hook size: 14

Bait: maggots

Maggots feeder: kinder egg, upgraded with holes and stone for weighting





Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.

Grass carp, koi carp, carp, kingfisher, grass snake, mallard duck, tadpole, frog, heron, …

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


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The common nase is a European potamodromous cyprinid fish. It is often simply called the nase, but that can refer to any species of its genus Chondrostoma. Name referring to the characteristic horny layer on the lower lip. Generally, these fish grow to 25-40 cm (9-15 in) in length, and weigh from 0.3 to 1 kg (0.6-2.2 lb).  In the river, nase prefer staying in currents, closer to the bottom, choosing stony surfaces covered with aquatic plants, or dense sand. 


Autumn 2022


Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .

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Riffle minnow was caught during barbel fishing and immediately returned to the river (autumn 2022).

More info about riffle minnow: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mmnz.20020780110



Characteristics

Length 9-13 cm. The side is folded down and bordered by two rows of parallel black dots. During spawning, a dark gray stripe appears along the flanks above the flank, and the fin bases on the underside of the body turn red.


Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .

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Fish – chub,, gudgeon, roach, common bleak, zander, …

Video was recorded with Waterwolf camera version 1.0.



Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .

THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media.