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Chub, also known as European chub, are freshwater fish that are part of the Cyprinidae family. They are commonly found in rivers and streams across Europe and parts of Asia. Chub have a distinctive appearance with a robust body, large scales, and a slightly concave head. They are omnivorous and feed on a variety of aquatic insects, crustaceans, and plant matter.

Chub are popular among anglers for their size and fighting ability when caught. They can grow quite large, with some individuals reaching weights of over 10 pounds.

Spinning for chub can be an exciting and rewarding fishing technique. Chub are known for their aggressive feeding behavior, making them a popular target for anglers using spinning gear. Here are some tips for spinning for chub:

  1. Lures: Chub are attracted to a variety of lures, including spinners, spoons, crankbaits, and soft plastics. Experiment with different lure types and colors to see what the chub in your area respond to best.
  2. Retrieve: Chub are known to be active predators, so a steady retrieve with occasional pauses or jerks can entice them to strike. Vary your retrieve speed and rhythm to mimic injured baitfish and trigger a strike.
  3. Location: Look for chub in areas with cover, such as fallen trees, overhanging branches, or rocks. Chub prefer areas with some current, so target minnows and other smaller fish where they can ambush prey.
  4. Tackle: Use light to medium spinning tackle to target chub. A sensitive rod and reel combo paired with light line will allow you to feel the strikes and enjoy the fight when hooking into a chub.
  5. Timing: Early morning and late afternoon are often productive times for chub fishing, as they are more active during these periods.

When fishing for chub, using the right lures can increase your chances of a successful catch. Here are some effective lures for targeting chub:

  1. Spinners: Spinners are a popular choice for chub fishing. Their flashy blades and spinning action can attract the attention of chub, enticing them to strike.
  2. Spoons: Spoons are another effective lure for chub. Their wobbling action mimics injured baitfish, making them irresistible to predatory chub.
  3. Crankbaits: Crankbaits that resemble small fish or insects can be effective for chub fishing. Retrieve them at varying speeds to find the right action that triggers a strike.
  4. Soft Plastics: Soft plastic lures like worms, grubs, or small creature baits can also be effective for chub. Rig them on a jig head or drop shot rig for enticing presentations.
  5. Topwater Lures: Floating lures that create surface disturbance, such as poppers or floating minnows, can be exciting to use when targeting chub in shallow water.

Remember to check local fishing regulations and practice catch-and-release when possible to help conserve chub populations.



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Maggots are the larvae of flies, typically found in decaying organic material such as food waste or animal carcasses. While maggots might not be everyone’s favorite topic, they play a vital role in the ecosystem by breaking down and recycling organic matter.

When it comes to fishing, many anglers have their go-to techniques and bait preferences. For me, maggots bait has always been my first choice (if, of course, the fishing rules allow their use).

Using maggots as fishing bait is a common and effective practice among anglers. Maggots are known to attract various fish species due to their scent and movement in the water. When using maggots for fishing, it’s essential to keep them fresh and alive until you’re ready to use them. You can store them in a cool, dark place and make sure to use them within a few days of purchase for optimal effectiveness.



Now, I know what you’re thinking – maggots, gross! But before you completely dismiss them, let me share with you why they are my first choice for bait.

First and foremost, maggots are highly effective at attracting fish. They emit a scent that is irresistible to many species, making them a reliable option for bait.

Another reason why I prefer using maggots is that they are easily available. You can find them at most bait and tackle shops

Maggots, on the other hand, are budget-friendly and can be reused for multiple fishing trips, as long as you keep them cool and fresh.

Of course, as with any live bait, there are some downsides to using maggots. They can be messy and require proper storage to keep them fresh and usable.

One of the things I appreciate the most about using maggots as bait is their versatility. They can be used in a variety of ways, such as on a hook, as a dropper, or as part of a bait rig. You can also pair them with other baits, such as worms or corn, to create a bait cocktail that will attract even more fish.

Conclusion

Fishing with live bait adds an extra level of excitement and increases your chances of getting a bite. While there are many live bait options available, maggots cleaned from sawdust are my go-to bait. They are highly effective, easily available, affordable, and versatile. So, the next time you’re out on the water, don’t be afraid to give maggots a try – you might be pleasantly surprised with the results. Happy fishing!

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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The European perch (Perca fluviatilis), also known simply as perch, is a freshwater fish native to Europe and northern Asia. It is a popular species among anglers and is known for its distinctive appearance with dark vertical stripes along its body. Perch are carnivorous and feed on smaller fish, insects, and crustaceans. They are commonly found in lakes, rivers, and ponds with clear water and vegetation. Perch play an important role in the ecosystem as both predator and prey.


I tried to save as many perch as possible from the intermittent stream. Unfortunately, it was not possible to save all of them, as some of the perch were already in a very bad condition due to the poor water quality. Perches have been released into water where they will have many chances to survive. (plenty of oxygen, food, etc.).

In terms of conservation, the European perch population can be affected by factors such as habitat degradation, pollution, and overfishing. It’s important to adhere to fishing regulations and practice responsible angling to help maintain healthy perch populations in their natural habitats.



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As autumn approaches, fish farmers can notice a significant change in the behavior of carp. Known for their size and voracious appetite, these bottom feeding fish seem to be even more active and eager to feed this time of year.

In the autumn season, the diet of carp changes significantly. As the temperatures drop and the days get shorter, the carp begin to prepare for the coming winter months. This transition affects their eating habits and nutritional needs.



In the autumn, carp switch to feeding mainly on more protein-rich food sources. This change is driven by the need to build up fat stores for energy in the colder months. Lowering the water temperature also affects their digestion, making them more selective in their food choices.

Factors Affecting the Appetite of Carps in Autumn

The general health of the carp population also plays a role in their appetite. Carp that have health problems such as parasites or infections may have a reduced appetite. Regular monitoring and maintenance of optimal water quality can help prevent health problems and promote a healthy appetite. The carp’s stress level can affect their appetite. Environmental changes, such as fluctuating water conditions or the presence of predators, can cause stress and reduce their desire to feed.

It is also very important to consider the availability of food sources in the pond. In autumn, the abundance of natural food such as insects and vegetation begins to decrease. This deficiency can lead to a reduction in carp feed intake. To compensate for the reduced availability of natural food, fish farmers must ensure a constant supply of high-quality pellets and live food.

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated. As an eBay Partner, I may be compensated if you make a purchase. As an Amazon UK Partner, I may be compensated if you make a purchase.



I was lucky enough to come across this large marble trout (scientific name Salmo marmoratus) which gracefully appeared in front of me and showed its majestic presence for a few fleeting seconds.




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 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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All the fish I caught were released back into the river.

Hook size: 14

Bait: maggots

Maggots feeder: kinder egg, upgraded with holes and stone for weighting





Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .


THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends

If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.

Grass carp, koi carp, carp, kingfisher, grass snake, mallard duck, tadpole, frog, heron, …

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .

THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media.