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Chub, also known as European chub, are freshwater fish that are part of the Cyprinidae family. They are commonly found in rivers and streams across Europe and parts of Asia. Chub have a distinctive appearance with a robust body, large scales, and a slightly concave head. They are omnivorous and feed on a variety of aquatic insects, crustaceans, and plant matter.

Chub are popular among anglers for their size and fighting ability when caught. They can grow quite large, with some individuals reaching weights of over 10 pounds.

Spinning for chub can be an exciting and rewarding fishing technique. Chub are known for their aggressive feeding behavior, making them a popular target for anglers using spinning gear. Here are some tips for spinning for chub:

  1. Lures: Chub are attracted to a variety of lures, including spinners, spoons, crankbaits, and soft plastics. Experiment with different lure types and colors to see what the chub in your area respond to best.
  2. Retrieve: Chub are known to be active predators, so a steady retrieve with occasional pauses or jerks can entice them to strike. Vary your retrieve speed and rhythm to mimic injured baitfish and trigger a strike.
  3. Location: Look for chub in areas with cover, such as fallen trees, overhanging branches, or rocks. Chub prefer areas with some current, so target minnows and other smaller fish where they can ambush prey.
  4. Tackle: Use light to medium spinning tackle to target chub. A sensitive rod and reel combo paired with light line will allow you to feel the strikes and enjoy the fight when hooking into a chub.
  5. Timing: Early morning and late afternoon are often productive times for chub fishing, as they are more active during these periods.

When fishing for chub, using the right lures can increase your chances of a successful catch. Here are some effective lures for targeting chub:

  1. Spinners: Spinners are a popular choice for chub fishing. Their flashy blades and spinning action can attract the attention of chub, enticing them to strike.
  2. Spoons: Spoons are another effective lure for chub. Their wobbling action mimics injured baitfish, making them irresistible to predatory chub.
  3. Crankbaits: Crankbaits that resemble small fish or insects can be effective for chub fishing. Retrieve them at varying speeds to find the right action that triggers a strike.
  4. Soft Plastics: Soft plastic lures like worms, grubs, or small creature baits can also be effective for chub. Rig them on a jig head or drop shot rig for enticing presentations.
  5. Topwater Lures: Floating lures that create surface disturbance, such as poppers or floating minnows, can be exciting to use when targeting chub in shallow water.

Remember to check local fishing regulations and practice catch-and-release when possible to help conserve chub populations.



Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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Maggots are the larvae of flies, typically found in decaying organic material such as food waste or animal carcasses. While maggots might not be everyone’s favorite topic, they play a vital role in the ecosystem by breaking down and recycling organic matter.

When it comes to fishing, many anglers have their go-to techniques and bait preferences. For me, maggots bait has always been my first choice (if, of course, the fishing rules allow their use).

Using maggots as fishing bait is a common and effective practice among anglers. Maggots are known to attract various fish species due to their scent and movement in the water. When using maggots for fishing, it’s essential to keep them fresh and alive until you’re ready to use them. You can store them in a cool, dark place and make sure to use them within a few days of purchase for optimal effectiveness.



Now, I know what you’re thinking – maggots, gross! But before you completely dismiss them, let me share with you why they are my first choice for bait.

First and foremost, maggots are highly effective at attracting fish. They emit a scent that is irresistible to many species, making them a reliable option for bait.

Another reason why I prefer using maggots is that they are easily available. You can find them at most bait and tackle shops

Maggots, on the other hand, are budget-friendly and can be reused for multiple fishing trips, as long as you keep them cool and fresh.

Of course, as with any live bait, there are some downsides to using maggots. They can be messy and require proper storage to keep them fresh and usable.

One of the things I appreciate the most about using maggots as bait is their versatility. They can be used in a variety of ways, such as on a hook, as a dropper, or as part of a bait rig. You can also pair them with other baits, such as worms or corn, to create a bait cocktail that will attract even more fish.

Conclusion

Fishing with live bait adds an extra level of excitement and increases your chances of getting a bite. While there are many live bait options available, maggots cleaned from sawdust are my go-to bait. They are highly effective, easily available, affordable, and versatile. So, the next time you’re out on the water, don’t be afraid to give maggots a try – you might be pleasantly surprised with the results. Happy fishing!

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.


Disclosure 

Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support.

This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated. As an eBay Partner, I may be compensated if you make a purchase. 


All the fish I caught were released back into the river.

Hook size: 14

Bait: maggots

Maggots feeder: kinder egg, upgraded with holes and stone for weighting





Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .


THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends

If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.

Feeding fish with casters and groundbait.




Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .

THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media.

If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.

The common nase is a European potamodromous cyprinid fish. It is often simply called the nase, but that can refer to any species of its genus Chondrostoma. Name referring to the characteristic horny layer on the lower lip. Generally, these fish grow to 25-40 cm (9-15 in) in length, and weigh from 0.3 to 1 kg (0.6-2.2 lb).  In the river, nase prefer staying in currents, closer to the bottom, choosing stony surfaces covered with aquatic plants, or dense sand. 


Autumn 2022


Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .

THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media.

Excellent natural bait for the vast majority of fish

Preparation:

  1. Soak hemp seed covered with water for 24 hours.
  2. After 24 hours, put the seeds covered with water in a pan and boil
  3. Simmer for approximately 30 minutes.
  4. Hemp seeds are cooked when most of the seeds have split and when little white shoots are seen.
  5. The seeds are now ready for fishing.
Hemp is a great way to attract fish (carp, roach, bream, barbel, tench, chub, …) any time of the year.


Some Facts About Hemp – Seeds

  • Hemp is the common term for a variety of plants in the Cannabis family. 
  • Hemp and its seeds have been used for thousands of years by various cultures.
    • Oldest known records of hemp farming go back 5000 years in China, although hemp industrialization probably goes back to ancient Egypt.
  • Hemp has the potential to replace plastic material.
  • One of the most important hemp seed benefits is its high quantity of proteins.
  • Hemp is incredibly sustainable.
  • Hemp seed food products are also considered more allergy-free than many other seeds.
  • Hemp seeds are high in nutritional value and contain 20 different varieties of amino acids and all nine of the essential amino acids.
  • Hemp and marijuana are not the same.
  • It was legal to pay taxes with hemp in America from 1631 until the early 1800s. (LA Times. Aug. 12, 1981.)
  • Refusing to grow hemp in America during the 17th and 18th centuries was against the law.
  • For thousands of years, 90% of all ships’ sails and rope were made from hemp.
  • Henry Ford’s first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the car itself was constructed from hemp.
  • In 1916, the U.S. Government predicted that by the 1940s all paper would come from hemp and that no more trees need to be cut down. Government studies report that 1 acre of hemp equals 4.1 acres of trees. Plans were in the works to implement such programs. (U.S. Department of Agriculture Archives.)
  •  80% of all textiles, fabrics, clothes, linen, drapes, bed sheets, etc., were made from hemp until the 1820s, with the introduction of the cotton gin.




hemp is split
Almost cooked.
hemp is split

Hemp seeds can be kept in the refrigerator for a few days (3 to 5 days maximum) or frozen and taken out of the chest when you need them for fishing.

Natural protein fishing bait.

hemp is split




When the hemp seeds are cooked there is no need to add anything as the seeds are already attractive enough for fish (high in proteins, natural oils, feed stimulators and attractants).

I most often add hemp oil to the warm seeds for even more attraction.



most of the hemp seeds have split

Conclusion

Cooked seeds can be used in spod mix, a great addition to ground bait mix, hook bait, It can be used on its own, etc.

My opinion is that this is one of the very rare baits that you can cook in your wife’s kitchen (talk to your wife first anyway ?) without stinking up the kitchen with unpleasant aromas, such as cooking chickpeas, corn, fish meal boilies with the aroma of squid, octopus, liver, monster crab and so on.

The smell of cooked seeds is very pleasant, no wonder fish love it.



Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – if you buy anything using links found in this blog post, I may make a small commission. It doesn’t cost you any more to buy via these affiliate links – and please feel entirely free not to do so of course – but it will help me to continue producing content. Thank you for your support .

THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media.

This video was not paid for by outside persons or manufacturers.

No fishing tackle or bait or anything was supplied to me for this video.

The content of this video, photos and my opinions were not reviewed or paid for by any outside persons.

This time I went river fishing in the afternoon with a minimal amount of fishing gear and used earthworms I dug along the river as bait. Earthworms were very easy to find. I used a very simple attachment (lead for the pencil drop shot technique and a larger hook for the big barbel). I didn’t even expect any special catch, maybe what kind of chub was the day more than successful for me, as I caught 8 chubs and 1 barbel. All the fish are released back into the river.

Enjoying autumn colors by the river, watching the last autumn flowers, bees, listening to birds, breathing fresh air, … and waiting for a fish bite is for me relaxation, calmness, inspiration, meditation in this stressful world.

“The best time to go fishing is when you can get away,” Robert Traver.


I was looking for earthworms for bait first.

I think most fish couldn’t resist this delicious protein snack ?.

Ready to cast.

After about a few minutes, this beauty was caught. one quick video and then the chub swam back into the river.

A few pieces of basic fishing gear I had in my backpack. Quite enough for successful fishing on the river.


▶ 5pcs Bait Storage Box, Earthworm Bait Container Bait on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3asdsr2

▶ 1 Box Pencil Drop Shot Weights 26pcs Set on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3mJWNVE

▶ Owner Mosquito 5177 Live Bait Hooks and is the The Ultimate Drop Shot Hook on Ebay: https://ebay.us/YQK67J

▶ OWNER Mosquito Bait Hooks 5177-053 Size 6 – Red – Pack of 10 on Ebay: https://ebay.us/8VhP3W

▶ Magreel Crankbaits Set Fishing VIB Lures Kit on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3oUz7R8 ? https://kit.co/fishingreligion








Snags.

?? Autumn is here ??.

For a bonus catch I was rewarded towards evening by this beauty ?.

Even this young chub could not resist the delicious (for fish) earthworms. I don’t know how he managed to eat such a bite.

Till next time …

…… tight lines and wet nets!

Author: Marina Kropec


Disclosure – if you buy anything using links found in this blog post, I may make a small commission. It doesn’t cost you any more to buy via these affiliate links – and please feel entirely free not to do so of course – but it will help me to continue producing content. Thank you for support.

THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media. I am SO thankful for you!

This video was not paid for by outside persons or manufacturers.

No fishing tackle or bait or anything was supplied to me for this video.

The content of this video, photos and my opinions were not reviewed or paid for by any outside persons.