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Chub, also known as European chub, are freshwater fish that are part of the Cyprinidae family. They are commonly found in rivers and streams across Europe and parts of Asia. Chub have a distinctive appearance with a robust body, large scales, and a slightly concave head. They are omnivorous and feed on a variety of aquatic insects, crustaceans, and plant matter.

Chub are popular among anglers for their size and fighting ability when caught. They can grow quite large, with some individuals reaching weights of over 10 pounds.

Spinning for chub can be an exciting and rewarding fishing technique. Chub are known for their aggressive feeding behavior, making them a popular target for anglers using spinning gear. Here are some tips for spinning for chub:

  1. Lures: Chub are attracted to a variety of lures, including spinners, spoons, crankbaits, and soft plastics. Experiment with different lure types and colors to see what the chub in your area respond to best.
  2. Retrieve: Chub are known to be active predators, so a steady retrieve with occasional pauses or jerks can entice them to strike. Vary your retrieve speed and rhythm to mimic injured baitfish and trigger a strike.
  3. Location: Look for chub in areas with cover, such as fallen trees, overhanging branches, or rocks. Chub prefer areas with some current, so target minnows and other smaller fish where they can ambush prey.
  4. Tackle: Use light to medium spinning tackle to target chub. A sensitive rod and reel combo paired with light line will allow you to feel the strikes and enjoy the fight when hooking into a chub.
  5. Timing: Early morning and late afternoon are often productive times for chub fishing, as they are more active during these periods.

When fishing for chub, using the right lures can increase your chances of a successful catch. Here are some effective lures for targeting chub:

  1. Spinners: Spinners are a popular choice for chub fishing. Their flashy blades and spinning action can attract the attention of chub, enticing them to strike.
  2. Spoons: Spoons are another effective lure for chub. Their wobbling action mimics injured baitfish, making them irresistible to predatory chub.
  3. Crankbaits: Crankbaits that resemble small fish or insects can be effective for chub fishing. Retrieve them at varying speeds to find the right action that triggers a strike.
  4. Soft Plastics: Soft plastic lures like worms, grubs, or small creature baits can also be effective for chub. Rig them on a jig head or drop shot rig for enticing presentations.
  5. Topwater Lures: Floating lures that create surface disturbance, such as poppers or floating minnows, can be exciting to use when targeting chub in shallow water.

Remember to check local fishing regulations and practice catch-and-release when possible to help conserve chub populations.



Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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Maggots are the larvae of flies, typically found in decaying organic material such as food waste or animal carcasses. While maggots might not be everyone’s favorite topic, they play a vital role in the ecosystem by breaking down and recycling organic matter.

When it comes to fishing, many anglers have their go-to techniques and bait preferences. For me, maggots bait has always been my first choice (if, of course, the fishing rules allow their use).

Using maggots as fishing bait is a common and effective practice among anglers. Maggots are known to attract various fish species due to their scent and movement in the water. When using maggots for fishing, it’s essential to keep them fresh and alive until you’re ready to use them. You can store them in a cool, dark place and make sure to use them within a few days of purchase for optimal effectiveness.



Now, I know what you’re thinking – maggots, gross! But before you completely dismiss them, let me share with you why they are my first choice for bait.

First and foremost, maggots are highly effective at attracting fish. They emit a scent that is irresistible to many species, making them a reliable option for bait.

Another reason why I prefer using maggots is that they are easily available. You can find them at most bait and tackle shops

Maggots, on the other hand, are budget-friendly and can be reused for multiple fishing trips, as long as you keep them cool and fresh.

Of course, as with any live bait, there are some downsides to using maggots. They can be messy and require proper storage to keep them fresh and usable.

One of the things I appreciate the most about using maggots as bait is their versatility. They can be used in a variety of ways, such as on a hook, as a dropper, or as part of a bait rig. You can also pair them with other baits, such as worms or corn, to create a bait cocktail that will attract even more fish.

Conclusion

Fishing with live bait adds an extra level of excitement and increases your chances of getting a bite. While there are many live bait options available, maggots cleaned from sawdust are my go-to bait. They are highly effective, easily available, affordable, and versatile. So, the next time you’re out on the water, don’t be afraid to give maggots a try – you might be pleasantly surprised with the results. Happy fishing!

Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated. As an eBay Partner, I may be compensated if you make a purchase. 


Have you ever come across a mute swan gliding effortlessly across a tranquil lake? With its striking white plumage and graceful presence, the mute swan is truly a sight to behold.

The mute swan (Cygnus olor) is a species of swan known for its elegant appearance and distinctive curved neck. It is native to Europe and parts of Asia. Mute swans are commonly found in ponds, rivers, and lakes, where they feed on aquatic plants, algae, small invertebrates and small insects. These elegant birds are known for their territorial nature and can be quite aggressive when defending their nesting sites.

The name “mute” comes from the fact that it is less vocal compared to other swan species. Mute swans are one of the heaviest flying birds in the world. Their impressive wingspan, which can measure up to 8 feet (2.4 meters), helps them glide gracefully through the air.

Mute swans typically lay around 5 to 10 eggs. For the first few days, mute swan cygnets stay close to their parents, learning essential skills like swimming and foraging for food. Mute swan cygnets have a gray plumage. Natural predators such as foxes, birds of prey, and even large fish pose a threat to these vulnerable youngsters. Additionally, human activities like pollution and habitat destruction can also impact the survival of mute swan cygnets.

Mute swans are protected in many countries and are often considered a symbol of beauty and grace.



Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.


Disclosure 

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This site contains affiliate links for which I may be compensated. As an eBay Partner, I may be compensated if you make a purchase. 




  • Conform to surgical Standards.
  • Should meet the demands of most fly fishermen.
  • Made from surgical stainless steel, with gold-plated finger loops. 


Excellent scissors, my rating 9/10.


Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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I was lucky enough to come across this large marble trout (scientific name Salmo marmoratus) which gracefully appeared in front of me and showed its majestic presence for a few fleeting seconds.




Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


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THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends

If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.

All the fish I caught were released back into the river.

Hook size: 14

Bait: maggots

Maggots feeder: kinder egg, upgraded with holes and stone for weighting





Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .


THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends

If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.

I recorded the skeleton of a wild animal in the video. Probably a victim of the recent floods. In my estimation it was a doe. Since the river still has a fairly fast flow, I tried to record as visible as possible. The video was recorded by the Waterwolf camera (first version).




Till next time …

 tight lines and wet landing nets!


Disclosure – Some of the links in this blog and in our videos may be affiliate links, and pay us a small commission if you use them. We really appreciate the support. Thank you for your support .


THANK YOU for all of your support, for visiting my blog, commenting, and sharing my posts with your friends and social media.

If you would like to use content from the Fishing Religion website (in whole or in part), please add a link to the contribution on our site in your post.